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fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

A very sexy but dangerous way to forge a sword.

fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

A very sexy but dangerous way to forge a sword.

(via glitchinthematrixx)

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defenestrador:

In the Wind, by Dejian Wu.

defenestrador:

In the Wind, by Dejian Wu.

(via a-lion-in-winter)

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infinitemachine:

Raven God by puimun
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"Fantasy is hardly an escape from reality. It’s a way of understanding it."

— Lloyd Alexander

(Source: observando, via mywhisperedcolors)

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waystone-inn:

Behind The Mountains by Ninjatic
Tags: fantasy
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(Source: nospheratusblack666, via fu2re)

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quarkmaster:

Illustration 2 by Nuare

quarkmaster:

Illustration 2 by Nuare

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gbsketch:

Day 683 - November 13th, 2013
10 minutes.

gbsketch:

Day 683 - November 13th, 2013

10 minutes.

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jettpack:

Here is the full scroll-able version of my last post! enjoy! These are assets I made for a freelance project. It is going to be a 2D game in the vein of SNES action platformers like ActRaiser. There are full day time, night time and dawn version of all of the assets. It was a fun challenge. Aesthetically I took it in a Russian direction as I am like to do.

jettpack:

Here is the full scroll-able version of my last post! enjoy! 
These are assets I made for a freelance project. It is going to be a 2D game in the vein of SNES action platformers like ActRaiser. There are full day time, night time and dawn version of all of the assets. It was a fun challenge. Aesthetically I took it in a Russian direction as I am like to do.

(via moominpond)

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(Source: mvgl, via jakeandsuch)

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fantastical-art:

Some great illustrations by Andrei Pervuhkin

(via meaniestranger)

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xandraj5te:

Students of fantasy literature credit William Morris with creating the invented world as setting for fantasy fiction. Before him authors tended to use settings — or imagined worlds — drawn from three traditions: (1) the landscape of knights and chivalry found in the medieval romance, (2) the forest populated by elves and sprites in Fairyland (or Faerie), and (3) the exotic mideastern landscape of the Arabian Nights. Thus, George MacDonald builds upon the first two in Phantastes, and George Meredith the last in The Shaving of Shagpat.
Morris, in contrast, creates entire societies, and is hence the direct source of more recent fantasy authors, such as J. R. R. Tolkien, Stephen Donaldson, Ursula K. LeGuin George R. R. Martin, Ann McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe. Like John Ruskin, Morris creates prose fantasies permeated by his beliefs about political economics. Although he draws upon both Germanic tribal society, which he believed to be pre-capitalist and democratic, and the age of feudalism and chivalry, Morris also creates entirely new worlds in The Well at the Worlds’s End and The Water of the Wondrous Isles. In these worlds the yoeman, independent farmer, and craftman serve as the center of society, and when knights and priests appear, they seem almost irrelevant. What do such imagined worlds have to do with Morris’s medievalism and socialism?
Morris’s earlier works in non-realist fiction, A Dream of John Ball and News from Nowhere, explictly advocate his political beliefs, with News from Nowhere taking the form of utopian fantasy set in the future. Why do you think Morris turned increasingly to narratives set within imagined cultures? Disillusionment with Marxism and socialism? The need to create personal visions of a better world in a new, less doctrinaire way? Return to his Pre-Raphaelite roots at the close of his life?
from Setting in the Works of William MorrisbyGeorge P. Landow, Professor of English and Art History, Brown University

xandraj5te:

Students of fantasy literature credit William Morris with creating the invented world as setting for fantasy fiction. Before him authors tended to use settings — or imagined worlds — drawn from three traditions: (1) the landscape of knights and chivalry found in the medieval romance, (2) the forest populated by elves and sprites in Fairyland (or Faerie), and (3) the exotic mideastern landscape of the Arabian Nights. Thus, George MacDonald builds upon the first two in Phantastes, and George Meredith the last in The Shaving of Shagpat.

Morris, in contrast, creates entire societies, and is hence the direct source of more recent fantasy authors, such as J. R. R. TolkienStephen DonaldsonUrsula K. LeGuin George R. R. MartinAnn McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe. Like John Ruskin, Morris creates prose fantasies permeated by his beliefs about political economics. Although he draws upon both Germanic tribal society, which he believed to be pre-capitalist and democratic, and the age of feudalism and chivalry, Morris also creates entirely new worlds in The Well at the Worlds’s End and The Water of the Wondrous Isles. In these worlds the yoeman, independent farmer, and craftman serve as the center of society, and when knights and priests appear, they seem almost irrelevant. What do such imagined worlds have to do with Morris’s medievalism and socialism?

Morris’s earlier works in non-realist fiction, A Dream of John Ball and News from Nowhere, explictly advocate his political beliefs, with News from Nowhere taking the form of utopian fantasy set in the future. Why do you think Morris turned increasingly to narratives set within imagined cultures? Disillusionment with Marxism and socialism? The need to create personal visions of a better world in a new, less doctrinaire way? Return to his Pre-Raphaelite roots at the close of his life?

from Setting in the Works of William Morris
byGeorge P. Landow, Professor of English and Art History, Brown University